Botsford Hospital
28050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48336-5919
(248) 471-8000
Map Contact Us
Facebook Twitter Google Plus YouTube Hospital Blog
Get social with Botsford

Spring 2012


Botsford HealthSource Magazine

Share/Save/Bookmark


black bean, pasta and
artichoke heart medley

Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Number of Servings: 12
Cups of Fruits and Vegetables per Person: 1

Ingredients:
1 tbsp. olive oil
1 cup green onions, sliced
1/2 tsp. oregano
1/2 tsp. basil
1/4 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. black pepper
1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper
1 garlic clove, minced
2 14½ oz. cans no-added-salt whole
tomatoes, undrained and chopped
15 oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained
4 cups hot cooked pasta (any shape)
14 oz. can artichoke hearts, drained and
quartered

Directions:
1. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over
medium heat. 2. Add green onions and
sauté five minutes. 3. Add oregano, basil,
salt, peppers, garlic and tomatoes; cover
and simmer 10 minutes. 4. Add beans;
cover and simmer an additional five
minutes. 5. Combine bean mixture, hot
cooked pasta and artichoke hearts in a large
bowl. Toss well. Serve warm or at room
temperature.

Nutrition Facts:
Serving Size: 1/12 of recipe
120 Calories, 15 Calories from Fat

Amount per Serving (% DV ):*
2 g (3%) Total fat; 0 g (0%) Saturated fat;
0 mg (0%) Cholesterol; 330 mg (14%) Sodium;
21 g (7%) Total carbohydrate; 3 g (12%) Dietary
fiber; 2 g Sugars; 5 g Protein; 4% Vitamin A;
15% Vitamin C; 4% Calcium; 15% Iron

*Percent Daily values are based on a 2,000-calorie diet.

Eating Well: Healthy Diet, Modest Cost

Nutritious diets come with hefty price tags. Or so it may seem.

According to a recent study in the journal Health Affairs, eating the right foods can be costly. Researchers tracked the cost of following the government’s dietary guidelines in one metropolitan area. They found that eating healthy foods like whole grains and vegetables was more expensive than filling up on saturated fats and sugar. Meeting the dietary requirements for just one nutrient—potassium—added up to $380 annually.

But hold off on purchasing that fast food. Remember, these estimated costs may not apply to all regions of the U.S. Here are tips for maintaining a healthy diet at a modest cost: