Botsford Hospital
28050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48336-5919
(248) 471-8000
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Fall 2012

Cardiac Rehab Assists Patient in Regaining His Life


Cardiac Rehab at Botsford pointed John
Chestnut
in the right direction--toward a
healthier lifestyle. Now he exercises three
times a week at a gym, along with staying
fit by keeping up with his dog. Eli.

Before having a major heart attack last November, John Chestnut didn’t get much exercise aside from the walking he did as part of his job with the Oakland County Water Resources Commission. But after having a stent— a small mesh tube—surgically inserted to open three blocked arteries; the 53-year-old Redford resident hit the gym through Botsford Hospital’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program.

The medically administered program features aerobic training on the elliptical machine, stationary bicycle and the treadmill in a gym-like setting. While patients exercise initially, a nurse or electrophysiologist monitors their heart rate and rhythm. “Aerobic activity in a supervised setting can help strengthen your heart, build your endurance and increase blood flow to the heart muscle to give you more stamina,” says Robert Grodman, D.O., medical director of Botsford’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program. Studies show that cardiac rehab can be a lifesaver. It improves survival rate and the risk factors associated with heart disease.

 

“Cardiac rehab put me on a better track in general,” says John, who attended a total of 22 hour long sessions over six weeks. After his cardiac rehab ended, John joined a local gym with his wife, Patricia. The couple now exercises together there three days a week, along with staying active by completing home improvement projects. John also totes his lunch to work instead of stopping for fast food, eats more fruits and vegetables and sticks to his medication regimen to reduce his blood pressure and cholesterol.

You don’t need to have had a heart attack or a heart procedure to be eligible for cardiac rehab. “Patients with a previous history of heart disease or angina can enroll in cardiac rehab to increase their endurance and functional capacity,” says Dr. Grodman. Ask your primary care physician for more information and a referral.

Interested in learning more about rehab? Call (248) 442-2565 to request brochures for the programs you need.

 

Resources:

Cardiology