Behind the Scenes: Security at Botsford Hospital

Security at Botsford Hospital

Michael Geldmacher (left) and supervisor Joseph Ziembroski (seated) monitor the goings-on throughout Botsford Hospital.

It was a day like any other in the halls of Botsford Hospital. But today, there was an unusual visitor, a woman, long brown hair and carrying a camera. Not an everyday camera, but something a bit bigger, more like one that a professional photographer might use. Two security officers quietly observed her as she passed them in the hallway. They didn’t see an employee or visitor badge. What was she doing?

They radioed back to the security central command office and requested a visual on the subject.  She was quickly located at her destination, questioned and the employee badge under her long hair was uncovered. You can’t get anything by Michael Geldmacher, head of security at Botsford Hospital. Employee identification badges are required at all times. If someone isn’t wearing a badge, there might be cause for concern.

Ensuring the safety of patients, employees and visitors to a hospital is a never-ending job. As Michael explains, hospitals are like small cities, where anything can happen at any time of day. They are always open and hundreds of thousands of people pass through their doors every year.

Security takes many forms
Michael’s team handles much of what you’d expect from a security team, although it’s usually misplaced belongings that they deal with. But sometimes the team actually becomes closer to patient care than they bargained for. Like when an employee showed signs of physical distress, the security team swooped in and got him to the Emergency and Trauma Center where he became a patient. Most on the security team are trained in CPR and AED use and actively prepare for any situation. They work closely with Farmington Hills police and fire departments to prepare for situations in and outside the hospital, like they did for this active shooter drill last year.

The security team also monitors the various notification systems within the hospital including fire and even those matching bracelets that Botsford Babies and their moms wear.

A seasoned security professional, Michael has seen many things but notes there are a few easy things everybody can do to stay safe in most situations.

Here are his top 5 tips for maintaining your own personal security when you’re in any public place:

  1. Lock your car doors! Even if you’re only running in for a minute. You’d be
    Michael Geldmacher

    Michael Geldmacher is head of security at Botsford Hospital. His tips can help keep you safe no matter where you travel.

    surprised how many people don’t take – or simply forget about – this simple precaution as they’re running errands or even as they park their car in their own driveway.

  2. Be aware of your surroundings.
  3. Travel in groups.
  4. Valet when you can.
  5. For office workers, lock valuables in a desk or cabinet.

Bonus Tip: Check IDs. This applies when dealing with any business whether it’s a utility worker coming to your home or a nurse visiting your hospital bedside. Always know who you’re talking to and don’t be afraid to ask for identification. In a hospital setting, this is also important as you divulge confidential medical or financial information. Remember this motto: No ID, no info! Botsford Hospital employees are trained to always have their identification visible and as you learned earlier in this article, Michael and his team make sure they comply for the safety of everyone.

So remember these tips no matter where you are and rest assured, the next time you visit Botsford or any other hospital, there’s a professional security team prepared for virtually any scenario.

Posted in Around Botsford | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

The Young Heart Attack Trend: What’s causing it and how to avoid it yourself

Botsford Hospital's cardiac cath lab emergency angioplasty team

The Emergency Angioplasty Team in the Cardiac Cath Lab at Botsford Hospital is seeing younger heart attack patients – probably due to stress.

The Emergency Angioplasty Team at Botsford Hospital is seeing a scary trend:  Younger heart attack patients. In 2012, the average age was around 50 years.

Why are relatively young people having heart attacks? To find out, we asked Heather Glover, RN, Botsford’s Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services. “Our high-stress world has probably been a significant factor leading to an increased number of patients requiring emergency angioplasty,” she explains. “And most of these patients are 50-ish—part of the ultra-stressed-out sandwich generation who care for aging parents while still supporting adult children.”

We live in stressful times; it can get to all of us. If left unmanaged, stress can lead to emotional, psychological and even physical problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pains or irregular heartbeats. And it’s the everyday things that can build up and cause problems. “When I think of stress, I tend to focus on the mounting, day-to-day things, such as broken furnaces, traffic, what’s for dinner, grocery shopping, rude people, sick kids or the loss of a loved one,” Heather says.

Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Fortunately stress-induced heart attacks at a young age may be preventable with stress

Heather Glover, RN has Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Heather Glover, RN, Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services at Botsford Hospital

management.  Heather offers these 11 stress management tips to help you avoid the emergency room:

  1. Get good sleep.
  2. Manage your weight.
  3. Drink water.
  4. Stand up straight.
  5. Avoid excess caffeine, sweets, work and alcohol.
  6. Eat your fruits and vegetables.
  7. Laugh daily.
  8. Don’t smoke.
  9. Manage your health issues. Take your medications. See your physician regularly.
  10. Exercise regularly. Activity is good; exercise is better.
  11. Shut out the world occasionally.

If you’d like to learn more about this or other cardiac health issues, mark your calendar! You can chat LIVE with Heather Glover, RN on Tuesday April 30th 2013 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the Botsford Hospital Facebook page.

Comments Off

The Young Heart Attack Trend: What’s causing it and how to avoid it yourself

Botsford Hospital's cardiac cath lab emergency angioplasty team

The Emergency Angioplasty Team in the Cardiac Cath Lab at Botsford Hospital is seeing younger heart attack patients – probably due to stress.

The Emergency Angioplasty Team at Botsford Hospital is seeing a scary trend:  Younger heart attack patients. In 2012, the average age was around 50 years.

Why are relatively young people having heart attacks? To find out, we asked Heather Glover, RN, Botsford’s Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services. “Our high-stress world has probably been a significant factor leading to an increased number of patients requiring emergency angioplasty,” she explains. “And most of these patients are 50-ish—part of the ultra-stressed-out sandwich generation who care for aging parents while still supporting adult children.”

We live in stressful times; it can get to all of us. If left unmanaged, stress can lead to emotional, psychological and even physical problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pains or irregular heartbeats. And it’s the everyday things that can build up and cause problems. “When I think of stress, I tend to focus on the mounting, day-to-day things, such as broken furnaces, traffic, what’s for dinner, grocery shopping, rude people, sick kids or the loss of a loved one,” Heather says.

Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Fortunately stress-induced heart attacks at a young age may be preventable with stress

Heather Glover, RN has Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Heather Glover, RN, Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services at Botsford Hospital

management.  Heather offers these 11 stress management tips to help you avoid the emergency room:

  1. Get good sleep.
  2. Manage your weight.
  3. Drink water.
  4. Stand up straight.
  5. Avoid excess caffeine, sweets, work and alcohol.
  6. Eat your fruits and vegetables.
  7. Laugh daily.
  8. Don’t smoke.
  9. Manage your health issues. Take your medications. See your physician regularly.
  10. Exercise regularly. Activity is good; exercise is better.
  11. Shut out the world occasionally.

If you’d like to learn more about this or other cardiac health issues, mark your calendar! You can chat LIVE with Heather Glover, RN on Tuesday April 30th 2013 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the Botsford Hospital Facebook page.

Posted in Prevention | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

8 Tips for Smart Snacking

smart snacking with chickpea poppers

Chickpeas are a smart snack idea and can be dressed up with a number of different spice mixes. Photo credit: askgeorgie.com

Snacking has a bad “wrap” mostly due to the fact that people are doing it in the wrong way. Snacking on high-fat, empty-calorie foods can not only pack on the pounds, but also starve your body of essential nutrients. Empty-calorie snack foods like potato chips, cookies, candies and soda pop can leave you feeling unsatisfied and craving more.

If you snack smart (read: healthy), you’ll reap many benefits including controlled blood glucose levels, stable metabolism and a reduction in overeating at the end of the day. Since empty-calorie foods do not provide vitamins, minerals, protein or fiber, you’re often left hungry after eating them, therefore more likely to graze on more unhealthy options.

When is the best time to snack?

The perfect time to snack throughout the day is between meals. If you have more than four hours between your meals, a snack may be a good idea. Another time that is prime for snacking is before or after workouts. This will provide the energy to get your body through the workout and will replenish carbohydrate stores upon completion.

What are the best snacks?

When choosing snacks, follow these 8 tips for smart snacking:

  1. Consume whole grain or whole wheat products. When it comes to starchy snacks, be sure it is made with 100% whole grain product, which can be found on the ingredients list. Sometimes it can be confusing but smart snacking is much easier once you learn how to read food labels.
  2. Choose snacks that are high in fiber. About 5 grams or more per serving is optimal.
  3. Select fruits if you have a sweet tooth. They can be just as satisfying as a sweet treat without the added calories and sugar.
  4. Pick vegetables. Veggies, especially fresh ones, are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber. Varying colors can help give your body a wide range of nutrients.
  5. Lean towards low fat and fat free dairy products. Calcium and vitamin D are needed for strong bones and can prevent breaks and fractures.
  6. Aim for lean protein. Adding lean proteins to snacks can help keep you full for a longer period of time.
  7. Focus on low sodium foods. Less than 140 milligrams per serving is considered low.
  8. Limit added sugars. High fructose corn syrup and sucrose and maltose, OH MY!

Try these healthy snacks:

  • Mix whole grain rice with chopped apple, nuts and a sprinkle of cinnamon.
  • Make a mini pizza with whole grain English muffin halves, pizza sauce, low fat mozzarella cheese, and overloaded with fresh veggies.
  • Chickpea Poppers. Here’s our adaptation of another recipe: Rinse a can of chickpeas and allow thorough drying. Spread the chickpeas evenly on a cooking sheet and drizzle over top olive oil and your choice of spice mixes. Try any of these yummy combinations: Oregano and garlic salt, lemon pepper and parmesan cheese, curry powder and cinnamon or cayenne pepper and cumin. Once chickpeas are seasoned, roast in the oven at 400 degrees until crisp.

These tips should help you start snacking a little smarter, but it can be a process. If you have questions or would like to learn more, especially if you have diabetes, consider attending this upcoming event:

Diabetes Saturday Sizzler
Saturday, March 2, 2013
8:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

For more information visit the Sizzler’s Facebook event page or our website.

Botsford Hospital registered dietitian Annie House and dietetic intern Jessica Jodoin contributed to this post.

Posted in Nutrition, Recipes | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

New therapy can diminish symptoms of heart diseases

EECP at Botsford Hospital

Enhanced External Counter Pulsation Therapy, or EECP, being performed at Botsford Hospital in Farmington Hills, MI.

Patients suffering from ischemic heart diseases often experience symptoms including chest pain, fatigue, shortness of breath and low energy levels in their daily lives.  George F. Riley was no exception, so when he found relief from a new noninvasive treatment while in Florida, he made sure Botsford Hospital could also offer it to people here in Michigan.

Thanks to a generous donation by Mr. Riley, Botsford has added a new piece of equipment called Enhanced External Counter Pulsation Therapy, or EECP.  It’s a safe, non-invasive, outpatient treatment option for patients suffering from ischemic heart disease, such as angina and heart failure.

The therapy involves the patient wearing large blood pressure-like cuffs over the lower body which inflate and deflate, increasing the force of the blood flow to the heart.  The procedure is done an hour a day, five days a week, for a total of 35 hours.

EECP has helped hundreds of thousands of patients around the world. Clinical studies show that more than 75 percent of patients benefit from EECP with sustained improvement up to three years post-treatment. Patients receiving

George F. Riley

George F. Riley

the therapy have reported:

  • Relief from chest pain
  • Decreased fatigue
  • Fewer episodes of shortness of breath
  • Improvements in energy and strength

Mr. Riley is feeling much better now and says the treatment

made him feel “much more energetic,” adding that “the effects really last.”

Learn more about Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP) or cardiology services at Botsford Hospital.

Posted in Technology, Treatment | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

Junior Optimists Deliver Magic Hugs to Kids at Botsford Hospital

Junior Optimists Deliver Magic Hugs to Kids at Botsford Hospital

Dr. Sanford Vieder (far right) accepting a donation of magical stuffed animals for children treated or visiting Botsford Trauma and Emergency Center. Left to right: Cathy Neal (Junior Optimist Advisor), Diana Kohler (The Botsford Foundation), Morgan Webb (Junior Optimist), Dana Iles (Junior Optimist), Dr. Sanford Vieder.

Being in an emergency room can create anxiety in anyone, but what if you’re just a child? Imagine being young, not sure what’s going on and you’re sick, hurt, scared or worried about a loved one. That image is just what inspired a group of Farmington Hills-area high school students to take action.

Wanting to do something to ease children’s anxiety at Botsford Hospital, the Farmington United Junior Optimist Club donated brand new Beanie Babies wrapped in Magic Hugs Squares. The tag on the Magic Hugs Square reads: “This magic blanket was made especially for you.  It is made out of hugs.  When you are sad or mad or scared or bored, hold this square close to you and it will give you the comfort of a million hugs.  It will love you no matter what!”

And the lovable plush toys just might work. EMTs in Missouri have been handing out stuffed animals for years and have found that they actually do calm children and lessen fears.

Giving back to the community has already started to pay off for Junior Optimists Morgan Webb and Dana Iles. While they were here making their special delivery, the Harrison High School students were treated to a tour of Botsford Trauma and Emergency Center by medical director Dr. Sanford Vieder. They had a great learning experience and Dr. Vieder even gave them sage advice on becoming a doctor. As it turns out Dr. Vieder is a Harrison High grad himself, so they’re already on their way!

The Farmington United Junior Optimist Club is comprised of high school students from Harrison, Farmington and North Farmington High Schools.  They are one of the many Junior Optimist clubs in our area sponsored by the Farmington/Farmington Hills Breakfast Optimist Club.  For more information about Junior Optimists clubs go to their website at www.f2hjunioroptimists.org.

If you’d like to donate or find another way to make a difference for patients at Botsford, visit www.botsford.org/foundation.

Posted in Around Botsford | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

Happy EECP Week! Celebrating a new way to mend a broken heart

EECP therapy is demonstrated here by two Botsford Hospital employees. It’s a non-invasive treatment for angina and heart failure.

There’s a new way to help mend a broken heart – with a treatment called EECP therapy. In fact, this new treatment now has it’s own week, which happens to be this week. EECP Week was created to raise awareness of this new treatment of angina and heart failure and honors the American Heart Association’s Heart Month.

So in honor of EECP Week and Heart Month, we thought we’d explain this new therapy.

What is EECP therapy?
EECP therapy, or Enhanced External Counterpulsation therapy, is noninvasive, meaning no instruments are entered into the body. Instead, inflatable cuffs are worn on the lower half of the body, and as they inflate and deflate, blood flow is increased to the heart and through the body.

Am I a candidate for EECP therapy?
Only your health care provider can say for sure, but you might want to start the conversation with him or her if you experience angina pain that is not relieved with medication and are unable to have one of the more traditional treatments such as balloon angioplasty or bypass surgery. EECP may also be an option if you have had angioplasty or bypass surgery, yet continue to suffer from chest pain. Many people are not good candidates for EECP however, including those with severe heart failure, who are taking certain medications or have implanted devices (among others).

Learn more about EECP therapy at Botsford Hospital.

EECP Week was initiated by the International EECP Therapists Association (IETA) and Vasomedical, Inc., the company behind the EECP equipment.

Posted in Technology, Treatment | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

How to read food labels

How to read food labels with Annie House RD Botsford HospitalThose nutrition food labels — you’ve seen them on almost every prepared food item in the grocery store.  They’ve been mandated since 1990 and they’re meant to give you the information you need to make smart, healthy food choices.  But sometimes they can be confusing and even downright misleading.

So Annie House, a Botsford Hospital registered dietitian, sat down with the Farmington Hills/Farmington Commission on Children, Youth and Families to explain those sometimes daunting nutrition food labels.

Tips to interpret & better understand food labels

Annie advises us to pay attention to the number of servings per container.  This is important because you have to multiply all the other numbers on the label by this number if you eat the whole container.  So if a food label says there are 45 calories in a serving, but the package includes 2.5 “servings per container,” that really means if you eat the whole container you’re really getting 45 calories multiplied by 2.5, which is 112.5 calories!

Annie also points out that the foods we should be eating the most don’t have food labels on them!  These include items found on the perimeter of the grocery store such as fruits, vegetables and fresh meats.  Annie says “the closer you can get to nature with these foods is better” because they don’t have additives in them.  Although most of these foods don’t have nutrition labels, they are packed with nutrition!  So try to include more of these in your diet and you’ll be making a big first step to healthier eating.

You can see the full video interview here.  Annie’s interview is about 25 minutes long but if you’ve ever found yourself confused by food labels, it’s worth watching the whole thing. You will learn:

  • Why food labels are important
  • What will you find on the food label
  • How to be an educated consumer
  • The first thing you should look at on the label
  • What a calorie is
  • Why labels are sometimes misleading
  • What each of the items on the label mean, such as total fat, saturated fat, % Daily Value
  • What are good fats and what are bad fats
  • The key to carbohydrates
  • What protein is and what the best types of protein to eat are
  • What ingredients to look for and avoid
  • Code words for sugar and sugar substitutes
  • Identify possible allergens
  • Finding nutritious options at restaurants

If you’d like to learn more about nutrition, healthy eating or even eating to prevent or control diabetes, browse the Botsford Hospital events calendar.  We have many workshops, demonstrations and classes to help you take a step toward better nutrition!

Posted in Cancer, Diabetes Education, Healthy Living, Nutrition | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

Botsford doctor answers flu questions

by David Walters, D.O., Chief Clinical Officer, Botsford Hospital.  Follow Dr. Walters on Twitter @BotsfordDocs
Dr. David Walters, Botsford Hospital Chief Clinical Officer

Dr. David Walters, chief clinical officer at Botsford Hospital, answers some of the most common questions he hears about the flu

As most everyone has heard this year has brought an early and relatively severe Influenza season on us. I have compiled some answers to frequently asked questions I’ve received from staff, patients and visitors.

Question 1:  How long will this flu season last?

According to CDC reports, the 2013 influenza outbreak in the U.S. is widespread with no reliable way to forecast the length or severity of the outbreak.

Question 2:  What are the symptoms of the flu?  

Flu-like symptoms include cough, fever, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, headache, body aches, chills and fatigue.  If you have 2 or more of these symptoms, do not go to work.

Question 3:  How do I prevent the flu?

The CDC recommends 3 Actions to protect yourself and others from the flu:

1.  Get a flu vaccine.  CDC recommends annual vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older, especially health care workers, to protect against flu viruses.  Children less than 6 months of age are at high risk of serious illness from the flu, but are too young to be vaccinated.  Those who care for them should be vaccinated instead.  It’s still not too late to get your influenza vaccination and the shot doesn’t have to cause a sore arm

 2.  Stop the spread of germs

    • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone (without the use of fever-reducing medicines). If your temperature is equal or greater than 100.6 degrees F, you should not go to work.  
    • Cover your nose/mouth with a tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing.  Throw the tissue in the trash after use. Flu virus is spread through droplet contact from an ill person or object that has been exposed to droplet contact (for example on a doorknob, phone, etc.). Cough, without fever, is not a contraindication to work, as long as you cover your cough appropriately.  However, a cough, in addition to one or more other symptoms would indicate you stay home; such as fever, sore throat, headache, body aches, chills and fatigue.
    • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.  If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol based hand rub.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.  Germs spread this way.
    • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated.

3.     Take antiviral medications if your doctor prescribes them

    • If you get sick with the flu, antiviral drugs may make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick, especially for those with high risk factors.
    • Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotic drugs and are not available over the counter.
    • Antiviral drugs are most effective when started within 48 hours of getting sick, but starting them later may still be helpful.  Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Please share this important information with co-workers, loved ones or others who may benefit but keep in mind it does not replace the advice from your doctor.  

Thanks and stay well,

David Walters, D.O.
@BotsfordDocs


Posted in Prevention | Comments Off

2012 in Review: Our most popular blog posts

 

Top 5 blog posts in 2012 on the Botsford Blog

 

As we look forward to creating more health, wellness and prevention content for you in 2013, we’re also taking a look back at 2012 to see what people read most.

Looking back helps us figure out what you might find helpful in the future.

Below is a list of our most popular blog posts in 2012 based on number of views:

  1. What if there’s an active shooter? Botsford prepares for crisis
  2. Benefits of Massage Therapy for Cancer Patients
  3. How to prevent hair loss from chemotherapy
  4. Health benefits of locally grown foods
  5. 4 Health Benefits of Grilling

If there’s a topic you’d like to see in the upcoming year, just let us know.  Send us a message on Twitter or Facebook – we’d love to hear from you!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Comments Off