Another Successful Cancer Screening Event!

Head and neck cancer screening at Botsford Cancer Center

A woman is screened for head and neck cancers at Botsford Cancer Center

This past Saturday marked another success for the community! Botsford Cancer Center held another free cancer screening, this time screening for head and neck cancers.

Even though spaces were limited, we were able to screen 64 people. Of those, 11 were referred for an immediate consult and 34 were recommended further evaluation. We are optimistic and hopeful that we may have caught cancer early and saved lives.

Most head and neck cancers begin in those head and neck areas lined with moist surfaces such as the nasal cavity, sinus, salivary glands, throat, voice box, or on the lips. Symptoms can include a lump or sore that doesn’t heal, a sore throat that doesn’t go away, difficulty swallowing or a change or hoarseness in the voice.

If you’d like a cancer screening but weren’t able to make it to our cancer screening event, talk to your doctor or contact a Botsford doctor.

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Importance of nutrition for cancer patients

Denise Cykiert, RD at Botsford Cancer Center

Joan (right), a patient at Botsford Cancer Center, samples fruit and yogurt parfaits made by Botsford dietitian Denise Cykiert during a cooking demonstration at the center.

If you’re fighting cancer, nutrition is a big concern.  It is extremely important for people with cancer to make food choices high in nutritional value, including vitamins, minerals, calories and protein because treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy can take a significant toll on the body.

While these cancer treatments are effective at treating the disease, they can destroy a portion of your healthy cells too.  Your body needs adequate calories and protein to rebuild itself, so it is important to choose foods high in nutritional value. If a person who is fighting cancer is not eating well, the healing process may be delayed and adverse effects can prevent the patient from completing the prescribed treatment plan, which in turn may affect the patient’s outcome.  If one does not take in enough calories, they may lose weight, feel overly fatigued, and generally experience a poorer quality of life.

On the other hand, foods that are high in nutritional value can promote healing, control the symptoms of cancer and reduce the side effects of cancer treatment. So at Botsford Cancer Center, we’re always on the lookout for foods and recipes that our patients can easily make at home to help nourish them through treatment. Easy to prepare, small snacks usually work best for our cancer patients, like this recipe for fruit and yogurt parfaits.

If you try the parfaits, let us know what you think in the comments below!

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Fruit & Yogurt Parfaits: Great nutrition for cancer patients

Fruit and yogurt parfaitFruit and yogurt parfaits are considered a multipurpose snack, packed full of nutritious benefits because they contain probiotics, protein, calcium, vitamin B2, vitamin B12, potassium and magnesium. The nutritional benefits are great for everyone, but cancer patients can especially benefit because nutrition is vital to successful cancer treatment. In fact, we like the nutritional value in these parfaits so much we recently demonstrated them for our patients and visitors at Botsford Cancer Center.

Fruit and yogurt parfaits pack a nutritional punch for cancer patients because they have a long list of benefits cancer patients need, including:

  • Osteoporosis prevention – Some chemotherapy treatments can cause bones to become brittle or bone marrow suppression, both of which can lead to osteoporosis (the thinning of bone tissue and loss of bone density over time). Vitamin D and calcium in yogurt will help strengthen bones. Check food labels to see which brands contain added vitamin D.
  • Maintaining gastrointestinal health - Probiotics (also known as “good bacteria”) help gastrointestinal conditions and help in maintaining bowel functions.  This is important for people with cancer because radiation and chemotherapy treatments can cause gastrointestinal distress such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and constipation.  Yogurt will provide the body with good bacteria that is used to fight off the “bad” bacteria which cause upset stomach. Also, some patients on antibiotics may need active cultures to replace bacteria that may be lost.  Yogurt with active cultures may also help with other gastrointestinal conditions such as lactose intolerance, colon cancer and inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Feeling fuller – Parfaits pack calories and protein into a relatively small serving which is important for cancer patients experiencing decreased appetite as a result of treatment. Choosing foods that are high in calories and protein and eating small, frequent meals can help maintain required nutrition when you just don’t feel like eating. Other options include semi-solid yogurt containing pieces of fruit and granola, drinkable yogurt and flavored dairy beverages.
  • Boost immune system function - Chemotherapy treatments may suppress the immune system by destroying both the good and bad cells. Make your parfait with blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, cranberries or strawberries to give your immune system a boost and it may also help to reduce your risk of several types of cancers.
  • Energy and bowel function – The bananas in the parfait are a great source of source of vitamins, minerals and fiber, which provide the body with energy and helps maintain bowel functions.

Fruit & Yogurt Parfait Recipe

Layer 1/3 cup vanilla yogurt into the bottoms of 4 tall glasses. Alternate layers of fruit, granola and yogurt until glasses are filled to the top. Serve parfaits immediately to keep granola crunchy.

Ingredients:

  1. 1 cup (8 oz) regular yogurt (if you’re undergoing cancer treatment, it’s best not to use light or low-fat yogurt because you need your calorie counts up!)
  2. ¼ cup each of two types of fruit. For cancer patients, I recommend any two of the following to maximize the cancer-fighting potential:
    • Blueberries
    • Strawberries
    • Bananas
    • Mandarin oranges
    • Pineapple
    • Apple pie filling
  3. Your choice of crunch, recommend (1/2 cup):
    • Trail Mix
    • Granola
    • Cereal (like Kashi GO LEAN Crunch with toasted berries)
  4. Whipped Cream (3 oz)

Nutrition Information (per serving): Calories 707, Protein 24 grams

Try these delicious variations!

Apple pie a la mode pafait

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz yogurt – apple cinnamon or vanilla flavor
  • Apple pie filling
  • Granola
  • Optional – cinnamon to sprinkle on top for garnish

Strawberry and banana parfait

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz yogurt cup – strawberry banana flavor
  • Granola
  • Strawberries, sliced
  • Banana, sliced
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Springtime lessons from Botsford Cancer Center

Nicholle Mehr, Botsford Cancer Center

Nicholle Mehr, director of Botsford Cancer Center, reflects on the lesson that Spring delivers.

Editor’s note:  Nicholle Mehr is director of Botsford Cancer Center and this is her first post in what we hope will be a series. She’ll reflect on the lessons she learns from running a cancer center; from her patients, staff and doctors or anything else that inspires her.  If there’s something you’d like Nicholle to write about, let us know by sending us a message on Facebook or Twitter.

With the first day of Spring upon us, the anticipation of warmth fills us with hope.   Soon the birds will be chirping and the smell of Spring will be in the air.  I love living in Michigan and experiencing the changing seasons.

As the warm weather comes our way I am reminded of the warmth that hits you as you walk in the doors of our center.   The feeling of warmth and hope is all around us here at the Botsford Cancer Center.   The center radiates joy, quiet strength and the spirit of hope.   The patients, caregivers and health care professionals who inhabit these walls are of the highest caliber of people.  They have the gift of genuine care and concern in their hearts.

Most would find working with cancer patients to be of a sad nature, but working in this field is inspiring.  I admire the strength and attitude of our patients who have such a deep appreciation for life.   It is a blessing to come to work and be surrounded by such amazing people with stories that melt your heart.

The cancer care team is a dream.   They are genuine, quality driven, compassionate, hard-working, intelligent, loving individuals.  I am honored to be able to walk into this center every day where miracles happen, hope is fostered and lives are forever changed.

Have a wonderful Spring and enjoy all of the blessings that life has to offer!

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Breast surgeon’s secret weapon against cancer isn’t a scalpel — it’s a nurse navigator

Botsford Breast Center nurse navigator Penny Widmaier, RN

Another way nurse navigators advocate for breast cancer patients is by making sure they know about all the resources available to them. Here, Penny Widmaier, RN explains support services offered at Botsford Cancer Center to a patient.

If you ask anyone whose mammogram results came back “abnormal,” the anxiety of waiting for the next step can be paralyzing.

“Is it cancer or isn’t it? If it is breast cancer, when can we start treating it?” The doctors have to perform more tests before they have answers to those and the many other questions swirling in your head so you sit and wait until the next time they can fit you in.

It’s a scenario that happens often but — thanks to a secret weapon — not so much any more at Botsford Breast Center. Waiting “can be one of the biggest sources of anxiety for patients,” says Dr. Cynthia Sandona, director of Botsford Breast Center. That’s why despite all the advanced technology and beautiful décor, one of Dr. Sandona’s favorite things about the Center is actually a person – Penny Widmaier, RN, a breast cancer nurse navigator.

One of the many things Penny does is she reduces or eliminates the waiting often experienced between an abnormal mammogram and a follow up appointment. Patients rarely have to wait longer than 24 to 48 hours after an abnormal mammogram result for a follow up appointment. And during those few hours they are waiting, patients tend to experience less anxiety knowing that there’s someone advocating for them. “I try to make their experience seamless and as easy as possible,” Penny explains.

Dr. Sandona trusts Penny to look after her patients and make sure they don’t get lost in the

Dr. Cynthia Sandona

Dr. Sandona says a breast cancer nurse navigator makes dealing with the disease easier for her patients.

maze that can be health care. Because no matter how perfect a system is, breast cancer is scary. Penny’s expert hand and human touch can make all the difference.

At Botsford Breast Center, a breast cancer nurse navigator is on the case at the first sign of an abnormal mammogram, whether breast cancer is diagnosed or not. If you’re due for a mammogram, please don’t wait. Request an appointment today.

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How to lend a helping hand to someone diagnosed with cancer

By Lynn C. Anderson, Director, Marketing and PR, Botsford Hospital

Lynn Anderson (from right), Linda Lee and Jennifer Moore have been close friends for more than 30 years. Moore was diagnosed with cancer in October. Anderson and Lee are an important part of her network of friends lending a hand.

In the past four months, I’ve had a good friend, a neighbor and a work colleague all diagnosed with cancer.   It brought me back to my own personal experiences, when my husband was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.   We had two small children, I was commuting 72 miles each day to work and he needed care round the clock.  I learned quickly how to appreciate the small things our friends, relatives and co-workers did to help us cope; and that it is okay to accept help from those who care.

So when people ask how they can help, here are a few suggestions based on my experiences. I find that the things you can do may depend on your relationship with the person so I’ve broken my suggestions into three categories:  A close friend, a neighbor and a co-worker.

How to support a close friend diagnosed with cancer or other illness:

I met my dear friend some 30 years ago when we were both young working mothers.   We supported each other through child-rearing, divorce, career decisions, death of a spouse, wedding planning and parents’ illness.  We know each other well so when she called to say she had cancer, I wanted to do as much as I could to help her.  Here’s what I found to be most helpful:

  1. Be a second set of ears to listen during doctor visits, second opinions and early chemo treatments.   A cancer diagnosis is complicated and it helps to have someone else hear what health professionals are saying.
  2. Help with research.   Help with online research and help them understand the disease, treatments and other important issues such as social security, work and insurance benefits and eating right.
  3. Spread the word and coordinate help.   CaringBridge.org is a great way to connect a patient’s entire community, creating a network for support for everyone involved.
  4. Support other family members.   A serious illness affects the entire family.   Offer to give a loved one a bit of time away, help with household chores or meals or just a chat to see how they are doing.
  5. Fulfill a wish. It doesn’t have to be a BIG wish.  We often talked about the fact we never had taken photos of ourselves together, so we hired a photographer to come to dinner one evening to take some shots we’ll all enjoy for years to come.

How to support a neighbor diagnosed with cancer or other illness

Our neighbor has found it is the little things that have helped so much.   It has also been a way for the neighborhood to come together and get to know one another better. Here are some things my neighborhood does to help support our neighbor diagnosed with cancer:

  1. Arrange a meal or transportation — One neighbor coordinates meals and another arranges trips to physician appointments and chemo treatments when our neighbor isn’t able to drive.    Those neighbors able to help with driving or a meal sign up for a day.
  2. Meals or other items are dropped off at another neighbor’s home, who sees that the items get to the patient.
  3. One neighbor makes homemade bread and stops in for a chat every Saturday morning.  Another neighbor calls or texts during the week for short chats, especially the days before a doctor appointment, the next PET scan or when he senses she is down.  He calls first, makes sure the visit is short and never goes in if he thinks he is getting sick.
  4. Other neighbors check in when going to the grocery store, pharmacy or dry cleaner to see if she needs anything.
  5. A teen offered to shovel snow this winter and is already planning to plant and water flowers for her porch this spring.
  6. “Secret Neighbors” have found random ways to show they care with a jar of hot fudge, a new magazine, a coffee gift card or putting the newspaper right at her doorstep so she doesn’t have to go down the sidewalk in the cold to pick it up. She doesn’t know who these neighbors are – they just leave little gifts and notes at her door.

How to support a co-worker diagnosed with cancer or other illness

When one of our Botsford Hospital co-workers learned she was diagnosed with cancer, everyone wanted to jump in to help.  She was always the one making special treats, decorating the office for a holiday or telling the funny joke.   Here is how we have helped:

  1. Donation of paid time off (PTO).  Not all employers provide this benefit, but at Botsford Hospital, employees can donate vacation or sick time (PTO) to a pool of funds to help a family’s financial burden.
  2. Get Well Cards.  This co-worker touches the lives of many seniors in her work, so we encouraged them to send greeting cards.  In less than six weeks, our co-worker has gotten more than 100 cards.
  3. A call, an email, a note, a text all are ways we stay in touch.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help

In addition to family and friends, social workers or health care navigators can help a patient find additional assistance.   The important part is to take advantage.   Friends, family and coworkers want to help.   It’s a way we can all feel better. Below are a few valuable resources, many of which are free:

  1. Most hospitals have personal support groups for the patient and the family helping with emotional needs.  Botsford has a number of groups and other cancer support resources.
  2. Gilda’s Club provides activities for patients and the entire family.
  3. The American Cancer Society has information on different cancers, treatments, research, end of life programs and support services in your area.
  4. Churches and other community groups also provide support to people at home and while in the hospital.
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Behind the Scenes: Security at Botsford Hospital

Security at Botsford Hospital

Michael Geldmacher (left) and supervisor Joseph Ziembroski (seated) monitor the goings-on throughout Botsford Hospital.

It was a day like any other in the halls of Botsford Hospital. But today, there was an unusual visitor, a woman, long brown hair and carrying a camera. Not an everyday camera, but something a bit bigger, more like one that a professional photographer might use. Two security officers quietly observed her as she passed them in the hallway. They didn’t see an employee or visitor badge. What was she doing?

They radioed back to the security central command office and requested a visual on the subject.  She was quickly located at her destination, questioned and the employee badge under her long hair was uncovered. You can’t get anything by Michael Geldmacher, head of security at Botsford Hospital. Employee identification badges are required at all times. If someone isn’t wearing a badge, there might be cause for concern.

Ensuring the safety of patients, employees and visitors to a hospital is a never-ending job. As Michael explains, hospitals are like small cities, where anything can happen at any time of day. They are always open and hundreds of thousands of people pass through their doors every year.

Security takes many forms
Michael’s team handles much of what you’d expect from a security team, although it’s usually misplaced belongings that they deal with. But sometimes the team actually becomes closer to patient care than they bargained for. Like when an employee showed signs of physical distress, the security team swooped in and got him to the Emergency and Trauma Center where he became a patient. Most on the security team are trained in CPR and AED use and actively prepare for any situation. They work closely with Farmington Hills police and fire departments to prepare for situations in and outside the hospital, like they did for this active shooter drill last year.

The security team also monitors the various notification systems within the hospital including fire and even those matching bracelets that Botsford Babies and their moms wear.

A seasoned security professional, Michael has seen many things but notes there are a few easy things everybody can do to stay safe in most situations.

Here are his top 5 tips for maintaining your own personal security when you’re in any public place:

  1. Lock your car doors! Even if you’re only running in for a minute. You’d be
    Michael Geldmacher

    Michael Geldmacher is head of security at Botsford Hospital. His tips can help keep you safe no matter where you travel.

    surprised how many people don’t take – or simply forget about – this simple precaution as they’re running errands or even as they park their car in their own driveway.

  2. Be aware of your surroundings.
  3. Travel in groups.
  4. Valet when you can.
  5. For office workers, lock valuables in a desk or cabinet.

Bonus Tip: Check IDs. This applies when dealing with any business whether it’s a utility worker coming to your home or a nurse visiting your hospital bedside. Always know who you’re talking to and don’t be afraid to ask for identification. In a hospital setting, this is also important as you divulge confidential medical or financial information. Remember this motto: No ID, no info! Botsford Hospital employees are trained to always have their identification visible and as you learned earlier in this article, Michael and his team make sure they comply for the safety of everyone.

So remember these tips no matter where you are and rest assured, the next time you visit Botsford or any other hospital, there’s a professional security team prepared for virtually any scenario.

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The Young Heart Attack Trend: What’s causing it and how to avoid it yourself

Botsford Hospital's cardiac cath lab emergency angioplasty team

The Emergency Angioplasty Team in the Cardiac Cath Lab at Botsford Hospital is seeing younger heart attack patients – probably due to stress.

The Emergency Angioplasty Team at Botsford Hospital is seeing a scary trend:  Younger heart attack patients. In 2012, the average age was around 50 years.

Why are relatively young people having heart attacks? To find out, we asked Heather Glover, RN, Botsford’s Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services. “Our high-stress world has probably been a significant factor leading to an increased number of patients requiring emergency angioplasty,” she explains. “And most of these patients are 50-ish—part of the ultra-stressed-out sandwich generation who care for aging parents while still supporting adult children.”

We live in stressful times; it can get to all of us. If left unmanaged, stress can lead to emotional, psychological and even physical problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pains or irregular heartbeats. And it’s the everyday things that can build up and cause problems. “When I think of stress, I tend to focus on the mounting, day-to-day things, such as broken furnaces, traffic, what’s for dinner, grocery shopping, rude people, sick kids or the loss of a loved one,” Heather says.

Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Fortunately stress-induced heart attacks at a young age may be preventable with stress

Heather Glover, RN has Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Heather Glover, RN, Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services at Botsford Hospital

management.  Heather offers these 11 stress management tips to help you avoid the emergency room:

  1. Get good sleep.
  2. Manage your weight.
  3. Drink water.
  4. Stand up straight.
  5. Avoid excess caffeine, sweets, work and alcohol.
  6. Eat your fruits and vegetables.
  7. Laugh daily.
  8. Don’t smoke.
  9. Manage your health issues. Take your medications. See your physician regularly.
  10. Exercise regularly. Activity is good; exercise is better.
  11. Shut out the world occasionally.

If you’d like to learn more about this or other cardiac health issues, mark your calendar! You can chat LIVE with Heather Glover, RN on Tuesday April 30th 2013 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the Botsford Hospital Facebook page.

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The Young Heart Attack Trend: What’s causing it and how to avoid it yourself

Botsford Hospital's cardiac cath lab emergency angioplasty team

The Emergency Angioplasty Team in the Cardiac Cath Lab at Botsford Hospital is seeing younger heart attack patients – probably due to stress.

The Emergency Angioplasty Team at Botsford Hospital is seeing a scary trend:  Younger heart attack patients. In 2012, the average age was around 50 years.

Why are relatively young people having heart attacks? To find out, we asked Heather Glover, RN, Botsford’s Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services. “Our high-stress world has probably been a significant factor leading to an increased number of patients requiring emergency angioplasty,” she explains. “And most of these patients are 50-ish—part of the ultra-stressed-out sandwich generation who care for aging parents while still supporting adult children.”

We live in stressful times; it can get to all of us. If left unmanaged, stress can lead to emotional, psychological and even physical problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pains or irregular heartbeats. And it’s the everyday things that can build up and cause problems. “When I think of stress, I tend to focus on the mounting, day-to-day things, such as broken furnaces, traffic, what’s for dinner, grocery shopping, rude people, sick kids or the loss of a loved one,” Heather says.

Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Fortunately stress-induced heart attacks at a young age may be preventable with stress

Heather Glover, RN has Stress Management Tips to Prevent a Heart Attack

Heather Glover, RN, Manager of Cardiopulmonary Services at Botsford Hospital

management.  Heather offers these 11 stress management tips to help you avoid the emergency room:

  1. Get good sleep.
  2. Manage your weight.
  3. Drink water.
  4. Stand up straight.
  5. Avoid excess caffeine, sweets, work and alcohol.
  6. Eat your fruits and vegetables.
  7. Laugh daily.
  8. Don’t smoke.
  9. Manage your health issues. Take your medications. See your physician regularly.
  10. Exercise regularly. Activity is good; exercise is better.
  11. Shut out the world occasionally.

If you’d like to learn more about this or other cardiac health issues, mark your calendar! You can chat LIVE with Heather Glover, RN on Tuesday April 30th 2013 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the Botsford Hospital Facebook page.

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8 Tips for Smart Snacking

smart snacking with chickpea poppers

Chickpeas are a smart snack idea and can be dressed up with a number of different spice mixes. Photo credit: askgeorgie.com

Snacking has a bad “wrap” mostly due to the fact that people are doing it in the wrong way. Snacking on high-fat, empty-calorie foods can not only pack on the pounds, but also starve your body of essential nutrients. Empty-calorie snack foods like potato chips, cookies, candies and soda pop can leave you feeling unsatisfied and craving more.

If you snack smart (read: healthy), you’ll reap many benefits including controlled blood glucose levels, stable metabolism and a reduction in overeating at the end of the day. Since empty-calorie foods do not provide vitamins, minerals, protein or fiber, you’re often left hungry after eating them, therefore more likely to graze on more unhealthy options.

When is the best time to snack?

The perfect time to snack throughout the day is between meals. If you have more than four hours between your meals, a snack may be a good idea. Another time that is prime for snacking is before or after workouts. This will provide the energy to get your body through the workout and will replenish carbohydrate stores upon completion.

What are the best snacks?

When choosing snacks, follow these 8 tips for smart snacking:

  1. Consume whole grain or whole wheat products. When it comes to starchy snacks, be sure it is made with 100% whole grain product, which can be found on the ingredients list. Sometimes it can be confusing but smart snacking is much easier once you learn how to read food labels.
  2. Choose snacks that are high in fiber. About 5 grams or more per serving is optimal.
  3. Select fruits if you have a sweet tooth. They can be just as satisfying as a sweet treat without the added calories and sugar.
  4. Pick vegetables. Veggies, especially fresh ones, are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber. Varying colors can help give your body a wide range of nutrients.
  5. Lean towards low fat and fat free dairy products. Calcium and vitamin D are needed for strong bones and can prevent breaks and fractures.
  6. Aim for lean protein. Adding lean proteins to snacks can help keep you full for a longer period of time.
  7. Focus on low sodium foods. Less than 140 milligrams per serving is considered low.
  8. Limit added sugars. High fructose corn syrup and sucrose and maltose, OH MY!

Try these healthy snacks:

  • Mix whole grain rice with chopped apple, nuts and a sprinkle of cinnamon.
  • Make a mini pizza with whole grain English muffin halves, pizza sauce, low fat mozzarella cheese, and overloaded with fresh veggies.
  • Chickpea Poppers. Here’s our adaptation of another recipe: Rinse a can of chickpeas and allow thorough drying. Spread the chickpeas evenly on a cooking sheet and drizzle over top olive oil and your choice of spice mixes. Try any of these yummy combinations: Oregano and garlic salt, lemon pepper and parmesan cheese, curry powder and cinnamon or cayenne pepper and cumin. Once chickpeas are seasoned, roast in the oven at 400 degrees until crisp.

These tips should help you start snacking a little smarter, but it can be a process. If you have questions or would like to learn more, especially if you have diabetes, consider attending this upcoming event:

Diabetes Saturday Sizzler
Saturday, March 2, 2013
8:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

For more information visit the Sizzler’s Facebook event page or our website.

Botsford Hospital registered dietitian Annie House and dietetic intern Jessica Jodoin contributed to this post.

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